We strive to provide exceptional care for every person, every time……

At Jessie McPherson Private Hospital, we take quality and safety seriously. To ensure we continue to keep our patients, staff and visitors safe and free from harm, we review a number of clinical indicators. Some of these have been published below for your information.

Babies with a healthy Apgar score

Apgar is a quick test that is performed on a baby at 1 and 5 minutes after birth. The 1 minute score determines how well the baby tolerated the birthing process. The 5 minute score tells the doctor how well the baby is doing outside the mother’s womb. The highest Apgar score is 10. Apgar scores are measured for every baby born at Jessie McPherson Private Hospital. A healthy Apgar score is defined as a score of seven or above.

The graph below shows the percentage of babies born at Jessie McPherson Private Hospital with a healthy Apgar score. This data is submitted to the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS) Clinical Indicator Program which compares our data to other hospitals. A higher rate is better. The benchmark rate is taken from the general aggregate rate for the most recent half-year reported.

The percentage of babies born at Jessie McPherson Private Hospital with a healthy Apgar score is higher than the benchmark rate.

Hand hygiene

One of the most effective ways to prevent infection spreading amongst patients is to ensure that all health professionals and anyone entering our facilities is engaged in good hand hygiene practice.

It is important to check that healthcare workers are using correct hand hygiene. Hand hygiene auditing is used at Jessie McPherson Private Hospital to monitor compliance against the critical times when hand hygiene should be performed in hospital. These are:

  • Before touching a patient
  • Before a procedure
  • After a procedure
  • After touching a patient
  • After touching a patient’s belongings or surroundings

The results of these are then compared against the national benchmark of 85% compliance. The graph below shows hand hygiene compliance for Jessie McPherson Private Hospital and compares this to the national benchmark.

Infection rates

Healthcare associated infections are a common and preventable risk to patient safety. Healthcare associated infections are infections that are either acquired in a healthcare facility, or occur as a result of healthcare interventions and are caused by micro-organisms such as bacteria and viruses. At Jessie McPherson Private Hospital we are committed to minimising the risk of infection to our patients, staff and visitors within our facilities. One way we do this is by collecting data on hospital acquired infections and reviewing this data to identify any trends or patterns, so that we can identify and implement best practice to reduce the risks of infection occurring. There are several types of infections and compliance to best practice that we monitor at Jessie McPherson Private Hospital: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), Clostridium difficile infections, and hand hygiene.

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia is a serious infection caused when this bacteria enters the blood stream. The graph below shows the number of Staphylococcus aureus infections at Jessie McPherson Private Hospital per 10,000 bed days. The government agreed target calls for a rate of no more than 2.0 infections per 10,000 bed days for each state and territory*.

The graph below shows that Jessie McPherson Private Hospital is well under this target with less than 1.0 infection per 10,000 bed days for each year reported.

http://www.nhpa.gov.au/internet/nhpa/publishing.nsf/Content/Media-Release-SAB-2012-13

Clostridium difficile

Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that commonly causes diarrhoea in hospitalised patients and individuals in the community. The graph below shows the number of clostridium difficile infections at Jessie McPherson Private Hospital per 10,000 bed days. This is compared to the most recent national annual incidence of hospital acquired clostridium difficile infections*.

The graph shows that Jessie McPherson Private Hospital is well below the national incidence rate.

https://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Surveillance-and-Monitoring-of-CDI-in-Australia-April-2015.pdf

Flu vaccination

Influenza (flu) is a highly contagious and potentially severe disease. Influenza vaccination is the only preventative measure to protect ourselves, our patients and visitors. People who work with those that might be at risk of serious complications should be immunised to avoid spreading the flu. Jessie McPherson Private Hospital monitors staff compliance with the influenza vaccination.

The graph below shows the rate of permanent staff members who have received an influenza vaccination at Jessie McPherson Private Hospital. This data is submitted to the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS) Clinical Indicator Program which compares our data to other hospitals. A higher rate is better. The benchmark rate is taken from the general aggregate rate for the most recent half-year reported.

Jessie McPherson Private Hospital’s influenza compliance is higher than the benchmark rate.

Patient Falls

Patients are at an increased risk of falling when they are in hospital. Falls are a common cause of hospital-acquired injury and it is important to assess patients to determine if they are at risk of falling and to ensure measures are in place to prevent falls. At Jessie McPherson Private Hospital we report and investigate every fall and ensure actions are in place to reduce the number of patient falls in hospital.

The graph below shows the rate of falls at Jessie McPherson Private Hospital. This data is submitted to the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS) Clinical Indicator Program which compares our data to other hospitals. A lower rate is better. The benchmark rate is taken from the general aggregate rate for the most recent half-year reported.

Jessie McPherson Private Hospital’s falls rate is lower than the benchmark rate.

Pressure Injuries

In hospital, pressure injuries can sometimes occur when a patient is lying or sitting on a chair and unable to move easily for a long period. Pressure injuries are caused by unrelieved pressure, shearing or friction resulting in pain and damage to skin and sometimes underlying tissue.

On admission, an assessment is completed to determine if patient’s are at risk of developing a pressure injury. Many strategies are in place to prevent pressure injuries developing in hospital and all incidents are reported and investigated to monitor the success of prevention strategies and ensure compliance with assessment and prevention.

The graph below shows the rate of pressure injuries reported at Jessie McPherson Private Hospital. This data is submitted to the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS) Clinical Indicator Program which compares our data to other hospitals. A lower rate is better. The benchmark rate is taken from the general aggregate rate for the most recent half-year reported.

Jessie McPherson Private Hospital’s pressure injury rate is lower than the benchmark rate.